A good security seal offers three primary forms of defence:

  • A Visual Deterrent to the Offender
  • Irreversible Proof that the security breach has been made
  • Ability to catalogue and Record items

In order to offer irreversible proof, the seal requires a unique number.

Don’t be caught out with blank/un-numbered product.

OBJECTIVES FOR NEW CARGO RULES (6 Oct 08)

The only cargo or mail (other than airline company mail which meets the requirements of CAANZ Rule 108.55(b)(11)) that can be loaded onto an international regular air transport passenger service aircraft at an airport in New Zealand is:

  1. A cargo or mail consignment received from a CAANZ authorised regulated air cargo agent (RACA) where:
       (a) The cargo or mail consignment is accompanied by a Declaration of Security issued by the RACA and signed by a person authorised in accordance with Rule 109.59;
       (b) The Declaration of Security has been checked to ensure it is properly completed and relates to the cargo received; and
       (c) The cargo or mail consignment has been checked to ensure that the consignment has not been tampered with.

Or:

  1. A cargo or mail consignment received from a customer, which is registered in the air operator’s Register of Known Customers, and which has systems and procedures in place meeting the requirements of Rule 109.61, where:
       (a) The cargo or mail consignment is accompanied by a Statement of Content identified as originating from the known customer;
       (b) The Statement of Content has been checked to ensure:
              (i) it is properly completed and relates to the cargo received; and
              (ii) the consignment does not contain any weapon, explosive, or other dangerous device, article or substance that may be used to commit an act of unlawful interference;
       (c) The cargo or mail consignment has been checked to ensure that the consignment has not been tampered with; and
       (d) A Declaration of Security has been issued by the air operator in respect of the cargo or mail consignment.

Or:

  1.  Cargo which has not previously had security controls applied (or which has lost its security controlled status), where the air operator has:
       (a) Ensured the cargo or mail consignment has been subject to appropriate security controls in accordance with the requirements of CAANZ Rule 108.55(d) in order to prevent any weapon, explosive, or other dangerous device, article or substance that may be used to commit an act of unlawful interference being carried in the consignment;
       (b) Established (or through regular audits and inspections ensured its cargo terminal operator has established) appropriate facilities and procedures equivalent to those required under CAANZ Rules 109.53, 109.55, 109.57, 109.59, 109.61, 109.63, 109.65, 109.67; and
       (c) Issued a Declaration of Security in respect of the cargo or mail consignment.

NOTES: The implementation of these security control procedures must be by persons who are appropriately trained and authorised in accordance with CAANZ Rule 109.59.

An air operator may contract out activities for which it is responsible (eg to its CTO) however the responsibility remains with the air operator.